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The effort has been simply to select from the almost overwhelming abundance of materials a considerable number of the most desirable books, and to describe them in such a way as to enable the student and reader to judge of their peculiarities and of their desirableness, as well as of their general merits. In the process of selection, two considerations have been predominant. The first has been the question of merit, the other the question of accessibility. In a few instances, books not easy to be procured have been described solely on account of their great importance.

But these are to be regarded as exceptional cases. In general, the most important historical works are easily accessible; and, therefore, it has not often been found necessary to select for description a work that is difficult to procure, or one that is without some characteristics of marked excellence. In dealing with books in French and German, I have sometimes given the title in the original and sometimes in English. If I had been writing exclusively, or even mainly, for those who know French and German, I should, of course, in all cases have given the titles in the original language.

But it seemed to me that the interests of good scholarship would be subserved by striving to render assistance to the largest practicable number of persons, rather than by limiting the usefulness of any considerable portion of the work to those who are familiar with the languages of France and Germany. In all cases, therefore, where a good translation has been made, the title has been given in English.

Where the translation is not conspicuous, either for its merits or its defects, the question has been determined by the consideration of accessibility. In such cases the language of the version most easy to be procured has been adopted. In case a translation is notably poor, the title has been given in the original language, but the fact of the existence of a translation has been indicated.

In determining the order in which books on a given subject, or in a given group, should be placed in the volume, I have also thought it wise not to be governed by a strict uniformity of method. Under the head of "General Histories" the alphabetical order seemed the most natural and desirable. But in those portions of the work which are devoted to "Histories of Limited Periods" the chronological order appeared to be most conducive to the convenience of the student.

Some of the books described it has been found impossible to subject to a strict classification; and, therefore, in some instances a title may be found where in advance it would not be looked for. With the help of the index, however, the student will have no difficulty in finding whatever the volume contains. Many of the works described have been published in two or more editions.

The principle of selection has been precisely that which would guide me in giving private advice to a student seeking information. Even at the risk of giving offence, I have not hesitated to condemn a reprint of an early edition when a revised and improved edition is accessible. The aim, in all cases, has been to indicate the best; and, in general, where there are two or more editions, each having peculiar characteristics of excellence, the fact has been noted, and the peculiarities of each have been pointed out. It will be found that there is considerable variety in the length and minuteness of the descriptions.

If this variety should seem to any one to be too marked, I have only to say, in explanation, that while the question involved is one on which probably no two persons would agree, it is certain that every one would deem it very unwise to give to all the books worthy of mention the same space that might properly be given to those of Gibbon and Macaulay or to those of Buckle and Bancroft.

In general, it has seemed to me that the fulness of the descriptions should be determined by the twofold consideration of the inherent merits of the work under review, and of the extent to which the historical student is likely to use it in the course of his investigations. I do not dare to hope that I have committed no errors in the perplexing task of determining what authors and books to admit to these pages and what to exclude from them. The difficulties of decision have often been very great; and I am fully aware that in a volume of this kind, not intended to be all-comprehensive in its scope, I am providing certain disappointment for a very considerable number of readers.

For all such I have no better word in the way of answer than that of Quintilian which I have placed on the title-page. If I did not hope that the book would be judged for what it contains rather than for what it omits, I should have no courage to give it to the public. But here a practical difficulty suggests itself. The multiplicity of books, even in my own language, renders i careful selection absolutely indispensable. It has been computed that of the ,? Suppose a person to read pages a day, or volumes a year, it would require years to exhaust such a library! How important is it, then, to know what to read!

And how shall this knowledge be obtained? Now let us revert to our opening remarks upon the value of a dictionary of words. If there be such an advantage in full definition, in alphabetical arrangement, and consequent facility of reference, why should we not have a dictionary of books and authors at well as of words? As anyone who reads mystery and crime fiction knows, for every Sayers or Christie, there are 20 or 30 others whose works are formulaic, unimaginative and a waste of your time.

It is important to understand that A Catalogue of Crime is no more readable as a book than a dictionary or an encyclopedia. It is a reference source. It is especially handy to have with you in a used book store. The book has helpful lists of especially good mysteries and worthwhile authors can also be found by browsing through the entries.

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In the meantime, the output of mysteries and crime fiction has been, if anything, more prolific than ever. Unfortunately, most of the output seems to be poor, which was probably true of most of the output of the golden age as well. Another outstanding guide to genre fiction from someone who has authored many e. While detective and mystery fiction may range widely, including everything from science to religious fiction, Bleiler chooses to limit the scope to the commonly understood genre, excluding works devoted to classical thrillers, adventure and espionage stories, gangster tales, historical novels, Westerns, and true-crime stories.

The book is arranged in chapters by reference type and then alphabetically by reference, with each entry containing standard bibliographic information: author or editor, title, place and year of publication, publisher, pagination, series title, index, edition or revision notes, and ISBN and LC numbers. Annotations furnish descriptions of intent, organization, and content along with perceptively critical evaluations varying in length from a single short paragraph to one page.

A worthwhile addition to the literature; recommended for public and academic libraries. Marilyn Rosenthal. This literature, once so voluminous a trade catalogue of contains numbers , is rapidly becoming scarcer, especially in the more desirable works.

The volumes exhibited have been selected by their owner from his private collection, numbering about two hundred and fifty volumes on Alchemy and seven hundred volumes on Chemistry not comprising periodicals. To Grolierites they will look rather unattractive in the original and inferior bindings, but many are curiously illustrated, and some are interesting for their very poverty.

The Catalogue has been very carefully prepared with technical accuracy, but economic reasons compelled short titles. Bibliographical and explanatory notes have been appended to the titles, in hopes of making the list more serviceable to non-professional readers. The editor alone is responsible for the data and the comments.

I have used the Modern Library fiction and non-fiction lists to find referrals and lists by Pringle and Moorcock to locate works of fantasy. For science fiction ideas, I have utilized a list of the best novels from to by David Pringle. A foreward by David Pringle provides continuity with the earlier list.

The new collection resembles the earlier one in that it is chronological rather than providing a countdown to the best novel of the period. It covers a shorter time by ten years and includes a much larger selection of female writers than the earlier book given the work produced in the period from which selections were made. I find this new list to be better written and to have more value than the prior one. Broderick and Di Filippo spend far less space than did Pringle on plot summary and provide more context regarding the subject matter in each book. There is also more discussion of how some volumes came to be written.

The authors also take the time to think through where each work and author rests in SF history. The authors demonstrate their considerable genre knowledge by recounting the literary history of certain tropes in the works represented. Broderick and Di Filippo also show some courage in evaluating the overall output of some of the authors contained in their list as when they suggest that Card would be regarded as "a minor, respectable, forgotten craftsman" if not for the Ender series.

The true value of the list, of course, is not in the reading pleasure it delivers but in leading the discerning user to new books and authors. Even though I thought I had consumed modestly in the SF field in recent years, I still found 87 books I had not read, many of which I had not come across in any other forum. In using lists as sources for reading referral, not only have I located hidden classics but I have found that virtually all recommended books reach at least an acceptable level of literary merit. Caserio also brings new attention to lesser-known writers who merit increased attention.

All the more than 17, entries are free to read online. I thus learned who was the author of the earliest comedy, properly so called, in our language. Sewell, Bishop Percy, Dr. Nott, and their followers, from the second instead of the first edition. The differences between the two are not merely extremely curious, but very interesting and important. Between the one discovery and the other there was an interval of perhaps fifty years; and whatever may appear to be new in the ensuing volumes has been the result of literary investigation during considerably more than that period.

My early employments were irksome and wearisome; but, stimulated in some degree by my first success, and by my love for the best poetry the world has produced, I lightened my labors by the collection and perusal of old English books, and by making extracts from and criticisms upon them, whether in prose or verse; so that in time they formed a large body of manuscripts, consisting of separate articles alphabetically arranged.

The work in the hands of the reader has been mainly derived from this source, and not a few of the notices are of forty, or even fifty, years standing. Although I kept constantly adding to, altering and correcting them, both as to facts and opinions, some of them are, in the most material points, just as they came from my pen, soon after the perusal of the books to which they relate. It will be found that a few are reviews of productions altogether unknown to bibliographers, while others apply to publications of which only a single copy remains to us, or to separate tracts of the utmost rarity.

It is true that notices of a very few more common, but still scarce, books will be found interspersed, a circumstance arising from the fact that I have incorporated all the productions formerly embraced in what is generally known as the "Bridgewater Catalogue," which about thirty years ago I prepared for the first Earl of Ellesmere, and which was privately printed at the expense of that gifted, enlightened, and liberal nobleman.

Through my hands in he dispersed, as presents, in different quarters of the globe, the fifty copies of which the whole impression consisted; but, some years after the completion of the undertaking, his Lordship expressed his regret, that the limitation in point of number much restricted the utility of that Catalogue. He therefore authorized me at any time to reprint it, if I thought it would answer as a pecuniary speculation. I did not then listen to it, because I was still anxious to introduce corrections upon many of the pages; and because, even then, I contemplated a work upon a broader basis, and of a wider range, not limited to the contents of any single library, whether public or private.

Readers may imagine that I have obtained much in formation from such works as Centura Literaria, " The British Bibliographer," or Restituta, to say nothing of smaller productions of a similar character. This is a mistake. I have never referred to them without acknowledgment; but it will be found in the fourteen hundred pages that follow this preface that, excepting for the sake of illustration or for the correction of some important error, I have never criticised, or I may almost say, quoted a single volume noticed by others. It was generally enough to induce me to lay an old book aside to find that it had already passed through the hands of Brydges, Park, or Haslewood.

To the taste and learning of the first I bear willing testimony. The second possessed knowledge, but without much discrimination; and the third was a man remarkable for his diligence, but remarkable also for the narrowness of his views, for his total want of judgment, and for the paucity of his information. I can assert, without the chance of contradiction, that there is no one book, the merits or peculiarities of which are discussed in these volumes, that has not passed through my own hands and been carefully read by my own eyes.

There is no extract, no line, that has not been copied by my own pen; and although I cannot for an instant suppose that I have altogether avoided mistakes, I hope that I have made as few as possible. In a case of this sort, where hundreds of names occur, and thousands of dates are given, errors must inevitably have crept in; but I am aware of none, whether relating to books or their authors, that I have not set right in the "Additions, Notes and Corrections," placed at the beginning of my book, as it were, to solicit the indulgence of the reader in the outset.

It may be necessary to add, that I have purposely avoided old English dramas and plays, because they form so distinct a subject that they ought to be separately treated. I have by me many details regarding the plots, characters, poetry and appliances of performances of this description, from the remotest dates, some of them relating to productions hitherto unrecorded; and if time, opportunity and eyesight should unexpectedly and graciously be allowed me, it will much add to my happiness to be able hereafter to put them into shape for publication.

Bum spiro spero. The Index was not devised to make money nor win lame, but was an invention mothered by necessity. The search through dozens of publishers' bulletins and pamphlets, no two ot which, even by a kindly chance, were alike in shape, size, or arrangement, if indeed there were any arrangement at all,—such a search was paying too dear for our information. It was a necessity that this information should be collected in one place and arranged for use.

No one seemed disposed to undertake the work ; even the six-months' list which supplemented the Annual American Catalogue, the only one which approached the cumulative plan, had been discontinued, and there was no choice but to provide for ourselves. The name "index" was adopted as best defining the scope of the new publication.

It was an author list, with brief title, price, and publisher, and references from titles and subjects to author entries. The name, though still retained, has been outgrown and does not adequately characterize the present volume. How often the bibliography should lie reprinted was left to the future to determine. By many ot our patrons, the cumulative plan was not understood. They had been waiting so long for such a finding list, that when it was in their hands they did not recognize it. While one appreciative friend, Mr.

Waters, of Pittsburg, the first to send us a good word, said that the Index was "too good to be true," others insisted that it was not true, and for over a year we received constant demands for back numbers, in spite of the assurance that back numbers were nseless, their contents having been reprinted in the latest number. After the publication of the December number, which was a complete catalogueof thebooks of , our circle of friends increased and we were encouraged to make further improvements.

A careful system was instituted under which few errors are likely to occur, or if made, can be promptly corrected. Before the publication of the Index of May , which was a cumulation of sixteen months, the whole bibliography was thoroughly revised and in large part rewritten, in order that the entry of each book might contain the full name of the author, the exact title as found on the title page, and other useful data before omitted. Since the publication of the May number our bibliography, owing to careful methods, has grown rapidly and now numbers in the present volume about 17, books, or about 40, entries.

Each entry has been compared with every available source of information, changes in prices and publishers have been recorded, and tables of contents have been added to the entries of those books not adequately described by title. This comparison has enabled us to discover mistakes in publishers' catalogues, and other book lists, and has won us the thanks of the Librarian of Congress for calling attention to a confusion of two authors of similar names and other errors in the copyright list.

These books are different in many ways from the modern novels but if you look closely you will recognize an aspect in the modern book which mirrors a theme or technique which was once considered brand new. Martin Edwards has once again given me a method for studying the classic crime novel and the authors who paved the way for all the changes which have taken place within the genre. There is simply too much information in this book to give anything like a list of authors or even a list of book titles.

I can tell you that there are twenty-four chapters, each dealing with a different aspect of the novels from miraculous murders also called impossible murders to the lure of the countryside, the English manor house, the amateur detective, the educated sleuth, the backlash against politicians and on and on. In each chapter Edwards explains the theme, gives a brief synopsis of the examples of the novels he has chosen to illustrate the theme and a brief biography of the author.

Each chapter discusses four or five novels. The book as a whole moves in a more or less chronological order, at least in the easiest way for the format to do that. The book also contains an Introduction, Select Bibliography, Index of Titles, and an Index of Authors which all provide a tremendous amount of detail on the subject.

Even the most well known authors may have a novel mentioned in this collection which you have missed. I was equally surprised at how many of the authors and stories I was familiar with as well as how many authors I knew nothing about. Even though I initially read this book in digital format I already know I will have to get the print edition so it can go on my shelf of Classic Age crime fiction reference books.

How could I resist? The history of practical invention and of technical progress is one which might well engage the attention of students of anthropology and antiquities, as it throws light on many points connected with the growth of social life and civilization. The desire and the power to turn external objects to his service and convenience are developed to such an extent in man, that, among the many differences between him and other animals, may be reckoned the various arts by which he induces nature to accommodate herself to his wants; among the lower animals one looks in vain for anything parallel to the arts of cookery, medicine, metallurgy—to the systematic use of tools, of clothing, of weapons.

In ancient times the various handicrafts were monopolies of certain families or castes; in the middle ages the handicraftsmen were too glad to pursue their callings in obscurity; it is only in the most recent years that arts and manufactures have acquired such paramount interest, that the special or technical education of those who are to exercise them has come to be thought of national importance. While, in the days of the Greeks and Romans, the artizan was a despicable if not an almost infamous person, and, in the middle ages, was oppressed by the military and ruling classes, against whom, nevertheless, he carried on a ceaseless struggle until he succeeded in asserting his importance, and even his equality with them, it has been reserved for the present day for ignorance of arts and manufactures, and indifference to their progress, to be as discreditable as they were formerly dignified.

The history of the growth of the arts themselves, and of the attitude of society towards them, is, therefore, of wider extent, and of greater philosophical interest than at first sight appears. This history has not as yet been written and, as time goes on and material gathers, the more difficult it becomes. The only work in which the attempt has been made is the "History of Inventions" of Beckmann, written towards the end of last century.

The essays, besides, are not arranged in any definite order, and have no direct connection with each other, but they are very elaborate, and show a wonderful amount of research and knowledge. There is certainly nothing on the subject in English. It is not my intention now to say anything about the progress of arts and manufactures at all, but only to bring under your notice a section of literature which is nearly ignored by bibliographers and antiquaries, and is altogether out of the ken of book-reprinting clubs.

It is hardly to be expected that a practical art can have any literature worth speaking of. The man who is busy practising it can have little time to write about it, and he who wishes to learn it must put to his hand and work at it, and that under the supervision of a master, and not by merely reading books. This is the apprenticeship that every one must serve. No amount of reading will make a sculptor, or a gardener, or a shoemaker, or a surgeon, or a musical executant.

The arts must be acquired by practice, and they are extended and improved by practice. Every one who exercises them comes to have special power and certain ways of doing things, which may enable him to surpass others who are similarly engaged. These are his "secrets," which very often he cannot, or will not, reveal to others. Rapid insight into a particular case, power of overcoming physical obstacles, ingenious adaptations of means to ends, exhibition of due care at the right time, enable one man to effect what others cannot.

The philosopher was warned to admit no one to his laboratory—or to his confidence. Even at the present day, secrets have not wholly died out; there are manufactures which are still undivulged, and any one engaged in the scientific investigation of some phenomenon or law of nature, will not tell his professional brethren unreservedly what he expects to discover, before he has finished his labours. It would seem, however, that in spite of the precautions of the older artists, their private ways of working, of producing substances, of making colours, and effecting all kinds of material changes, oozed out and became at last public property.

It is beyond my power to give a complete list of these; my purpose at present, as I have already said, is to exhibit a few of those to which my attention happens to have been recently directed, and of which some at least are possessed of a certain amount of archaeological and bibliographic interest. This set of books divides into several groups, but perfect classification of them is impossible on account of the way the themes interweave. There are collections of secrets of nature, or treatises on natural history, general science, and cosmogony. This is the form which natural philosophy originally took.

There are treatises on technical or art secrets, strictly so called, and they may be arranged conveniently in two classes: general collections containing receipts relating to a variety of arts, and special collections containing receipts of use in one art or handicraft only. The author is a bit annoying in trying to narrowly define the detective story, however. Nowadays, when genres and sub-genres tend to be blended together for good or ill, this sort of distinction seems unnecessary.

It reminds me of the used book store I visited where mystery was in one section and crime in another. And thrillers in yet another. Also, unfortunately, the entire career of Dashiell Hammett, who even at that early date had already stopped writing. The main part of the book mentions Raymond Chandler only very briefly, but the years-after update does give him credit and add some of his works to the recommended list. More interesting, perhaps, are the writers that have been largely forgotten that Haycraft extolls, such as Mabel Sealey, who is pretty forgotten today.

His concise descriptions of his subjects' works, without any plot spoilers to speak of, will whet your appetite to try out some of these books, many of which are now in the public domain. Given his chosen framework, Haycraft only really errs when he states decisively that women do not make good fictional detectives. It is a bit jarring to read such a blatantly sexist statement in a book that is otherwise a model of balance. Haycraft, for instance, points out not just the strengths of each writer, but also their weaknesses.

Now that I know I have it, it comes upstairs to be on my reference shelf. What makes it extra-special is that it covers the world of writers in those genres for primarily the post-war period. Earlier reviews by contributing writers give us an overview of the various sub-genres in a clear and informative way. Hundreds of authors are discussed many of whom I had not heard of along with a list of their best or most popular books. This section was put together by Dorothy B. This section alone is worth the price of admission.

I have several of the standard reference texts on crime novels, but this one is the best. Highly recommended. Aside from Jon L. Moreover, Mr. Murphy provides etymological histories of terms often encountered in the mystery novel and dispels common misconceptions readers have about the true purposes of agencies like INTERPOL. No subgenre is ignored: cozies, malice-domestics, psychological suspense, police procedurals, and the hard-boiled novel are all given equal attention.

Brilliant, but forgotten crime writers like Charles Willeford, often ignored in other encyclopedias and bibliograpies, are finally given the respect they deserve. And cozy novelists Leo Bruce and Patricia Wentworth are rarely examined in the depth that they are here. Besides being comprehensive and informative, the book is just plain fun to read-a must for home libraries and coffee tables.

It is otherwise however with the literature of the North, and especially of Russia, of which even our men of letters, for the most part, know nothing more than what may be gleaned from the common Russian Miscellanies. The chief ground of this ignorance can only be looked for in our very limited acquaintance with the Sclavonic languages; and here the same reproach attaches to the Germans, on other points so studious of knowledge, which is justly brought against the French and Italians in regard to the literature of Germany.

Of all the kingdoms of the North, the Russian Empire, marching on with giant strides towards a state of perfection, rivets most our earnest attention; and yet its language and its literature continue to be almost entirely unknown. Since the beginning of the eigh- ,teenth century, we find intellectual relations existing between Russia and the other European communities; and a strict comparison would show, that at this period German literature itself occupied no very lofty position.

Might not the Italians and French just as well plead this consideration as their excuse, if at the beginning of the nineteenth century they chose to believe that German literature had nothing very great to exhibit? It is asserted that in Russia the higher classes only can make any pretensions to education; but it is forgotten that in every country the great mass of the people resemble each other in this particular, of which every traveller possessing the mere rudiments of any language may convince himself, if, instead of taking the chief towns only as the standard of his conclusions, he will submit to pass some time also with this view in the countryb.

Although the Russians as yet can boast no Gothe or Shakspeare—even supposing that these writers could be equalled—yet we already see them, since the middle of last century, in the track which, by the exercise of their extraordinary application and ability, must sooner or later bring them near this point. Gretsch, published in the Russian language at St. Petersburg, A. This work, written by the Russian imperial councillor of state, Nicolai von Gretsch, a distinguished philologist and grammarian, has been taken as the foundation of the present undertaking; the publication of which is intended to fill up a very perceptible void in our literature.

Besides the Russian authors mentioned by Herr von Gretsch, many others have been added to render the second part of this work more complete; especially those which Alexander Bestuscheff has enumerated in his Review of Russian Literature. Although on the whole I have adhered to the above-named work of Herr von Gretsch, it appeared to me better suited to my particular plan to divide the History of Literature into two parts; of which the first contains the proper History of Russian Literature, and the second, Biographical and Literary Notices of Russian Authors; and to which last, for the sake of greater convenience, I have given the form of a lexicon.

The prizes are reserved for the millionaire. But the most modest bibliophile, by the pursuit of one special subject, may get together a collection valuable for other reasons. I do not know that I deserve so ambitious a name as bibliophile, but I have no doubt as to the value of the collection of cookery books about which it has been my pleasure and privilege to write. I admit that to the moneyed book-hunter, though he would envy me a few of my volumes, a great number, from his point of view, might seem poor trash.

Nor do I claim for my collection completeness. I would not be so foolish with those two thousand five hundred entries in M. But then, M. Vicaire does not own the two thousand five hundred books, and I very much doubt whether any one individual ever will. The collector is but mortal. All I claim is that my collection has grown to respectable and, I believe, unrivaled proportions, and that the number of books in it, and the countries and centuries they represent lend them as a series the importance which it would be absurd to attribute to each taken separately.

As for the subject, mine first by chance and now by preference, it needs no apology. Everybody eats and everybody should enjoy eating. The old asceticism that held pleasure in food to be gluttony, and consequently one of the seven deadly sins, has all but disappeared. Every Woman has thrown off the traditional shackles and is no longer ashamed of an honest appetite.

In one way, something of the old prejudice lingers. It is still considered demoralizing, or, at least, " bad form " to think much about food and drink. But this is a mistake. It was when men and women began to think about eating that they developed it into the Fine Art it ought to be. Sounds might have remained mere noise but for the musician, colors mere discord but for the painter; eating would never have been more than a gross necessity but for the gourmet. Neither does the study of Gastronomy through the ages call for an explanation. It would be more to the purpose to explain why the historian and the philosopher have hitherto paid so little heed to the subject.

The world still waits for the Carlyle who will write for it a Philosophy of Food. When he comes he will find in my collection the material made to his hand. But if eating were not an art, if food had not its philosophy, my books would still be amusing, and that is their great recommendation. No black-letter man, nor tall copyist, nor uncut man, nor rough-edge man, nor early English dramatist, nor Elzevirian, nor broadsider, nor pasquinader, nor old brown calf man, nor Grangerite, nor tawny moroccoite, nor gilt copper, nor marbled insider, nor editio princeps man, to borrow Dr.

Now this amusement, for several reasons, either dwindles, or else changes its character so completely, by the end of the eighteenth century that I have brought the story of my books and the bibliography down to no later date. In the nineteenth century there were, on the one hand, the cookery books, prosaic as primers, that, with their business-like, practical, direct methods, were more useful in the kitchen than entertaining in the library; on the other hand, the books about cookery, so literary in flavor that they were not adapted to the kitchen at all.

The new writers, of whom Orimod de la Seyniere was the first great master, brought about such a revolution in not only the style, but the very attitude of writers on cookery, that I prefer to consider their work by itself. My study of all these books has made me sufficiently an artist to want to see my own volume as perfectly rounded out. It is my respect for them that shows me the folly of dogmatizing upon the many I do not know at first hand.

In the following pages, I do not pretend to rival M. Vicaire or Mr. Hazlitt bibliographicatty. I have not the temerity to wander further afield than my own collection. The illustrations speak for themselves. The old titlepage always has charm, and, in the cookery book, it has besides a character of its own. The portraits that appear as frontispieces are, to me, an endless source of delight. What new dignity a cookery book acquires when a queen or a man of title presides over it! And with what increased deference one reads the receipts of the chef who evidently takes himself as seriously and solemnly as Robert May or E.

I wish I could give all the portraits. But it would be unfair to my collection if I did not also show some of the amazing allegories which occasionally replaced the portrait as frontispiece, and of which the plates from Les Dons de Comus and Dr. There are, moreover, the illustrations in the text. The models for the carver, whether of fish, fowl, or fruit, are characteristic, and the one design for setting a table barely does justice to a detail of dining, that, for long, pre-occupied the authorities.

The eighteenth century books are full of such plates. It is impossible, however, to exhaust a collection like mine in a single volume. I can only hope that what illustrations there are, together with my praise, all too feeble, of the irresistible text, will send the curious to the originals. The book is pages of mystery authors - listed alphabetically and giving descriptons of the authors' characters, the authors' lives and biographical bits.

The books are broken down by code within the genre: ie, Action and Adventure, Comedy, Classic Sleuths, Private Eyes, Thriller and many many more categories. I recommend this book as either a reference book or as just a darned good read. Thank you, Bill and Marcia for taking the time to write this book. An examination of so much as Mr. Power had done on the subject of bibliography, led me to the conclusion that he had not made a personal examination of the books described, and that the eminent individuals, whom he thanks as having rendered him valuable assistance, must have had rather limited bibliographical resources; indeed, the general result was so disappointing that I determined to endeavor an improvement, and the result is the present list which is about four times the extent of Mr.

I cannot close this brief notice without tendering my thanks to Mr. Charles A. Cutter of the Boston Athenaeum for his valuable aid. When librarians in general can approach his standard of library intelligence, there will cease to be that plentiful lack of knowledge by which some of them are now distinguished. Breath taking, because it wishes to tell the history of the novel since its inception [evolutionary origins if you prefer], and parochial because the work wishes to focus on the English Novel.

The latter goal is never, really, accomplished because so many novels, written in languages other than English have influenced the English Novel. There is, also, the problem of the antecedents of the novel that are not even mentioned — such as The Tale of Genji [a Japanese classic — published early in the 11th century…if you were to go by the still popular Gregorian Calendar—dating is its own political nightmare]. Each chapter tends to follow a, generally, chronological motif, but within the chapter other authors are brought in as inheritors or antecedents of the work being discussed.

What this does is to help the reader place the book in history and in its influence and, therefore, importance. What is frustrating about Mr. Still, this history is fascinating and very idiosyncratic. The major drawback to a book such as The Novel is that it is just too bloody long for most readers, and impossible to carry about in its physical form.

The sheer physical reality of the book does not permit this—this is, however, somewhat offset by the increasing popularity of eBooks. Having said all of this, it is an important book, and one that should be read by anyone interested in the history of the English novel. The Novel should also, and most specifically, be read by Indie authors not having a firm grounding in the Canon, in all its mutant glory. After all, if you are going to write fiction you should be aware of the traditions you are writing in. Why Schmidt is important in this respect is that he does not consider the Canon to be made up of strictly Literary Fiction, but also includes important Genre authors as well.

He is a little cautious with idea of Literary Fiction and Genre but that is another discussion—shouting match? In the end, this history earns a respectable 4 out of 5 stars. The subtraction of one star is because of its length; its lack of references, and its sometimes-questionable aesthetics—see Burroughs and Kerouac, amongst others. It is, in a literary way, an embarrassment of riches.

Describing this extensive overview of everything worth noting about 20th century literature in English can be compared to the blind men describing an elephant. So much to cover, so many varieties of prose, and so little space to describe it all. The giants are here, and if greatness is measured by the space allotted to them, then D.

Lawrence leads, with two full pages dedicated to his achievements, followed by James Joyce, T. Yeats with one page. LeGuin and Michael Moorcock fantasy , J. Identifying these movements can sometimes be an exercise in deciphering obscure meanings. The entry on Modernism, for example, defines clearly its practitioners.

Their works, however, "indicate the breach with the conventions of rational exposition and stylistic decorum in the immediate post-war period. Apart from that caveat, this Oxford Companion is a worthwhile aid through 20th century literature. Which one that is right for you depends entirely on where your taste in literature lies. Sepulture and Sepulchral Inscriptions, but merely as a catalogue of such books on those subjects as in the course of my reading have come to my notice. I am painfully conscious of the deficiencies of this compilation.

A small additional expenditure of time might have corrected many defects. I had not the additional time to spare, and the question was either to print my imperfect notes as they were, or not to print at all. The former alternative prevailed, and my daughter arranged the following titles for the press.

I do not pretend to have so much as seen the majority of the books catalogued, and, judging from the number of misleading titles I discovered, I doubt not but many have escaped detection. My excuse for earing in this field of literature is, I but follow the examples of, among others, the lawyers, Spellman, Bosio, and Collinson. Adams and Dr. Hugo Erichsons' "Bibliographies of Cremation. I regret my inability at present to produce Part II, for if the compilation has any interest, it lies chiefly in the second part. My friends will kindly take notice that I solicit additions to my catalogue and memoranda of errors.

But besides these, some thousands of additional names have been selected, which will be of service to the reader in many departments of intellectual activity. It has not been any part of the plan to attempt a comprehensive list of those who have written books; but, following the idea of similar works to present names, in many departments, fairly representative of literary history.

While this general and cosmopolitan plan has been adhered to, considerable prominence has been given to American names, and to writers who have won distinction in works on law, art, travel, and exploration, and indeed in all liberal pursuits. The "promotion and diffusion of knowledge among mankind" has been held to be an object worthy of the highest human effort. To have contributed to this effort has been the purpose of those engaged in this work. In preparing it the best authorities in many languages have been consulted ; but those familiar with dictionaries and cyclopaedias know how liable they are to err.

If we have erred as to dates or names in this, it has probably been from having to make a choice between several authorities disagreeing and of good standing. The plot is bizzare, to say the least. A man discovers that he has radish sprouts growing from his shins. His condition baffles the doctor at a local dermatology clinic, who sends him away in a self propelled hospital bed, telling him to try hot spring treatment.

My Shopping Bag

While en-route to the hot springs, he is cast down a dark tunnel and ends up on the shores of hell. Early in the novel, the narrator comments that marsupials are essentially inferior versions of mammals. The narrator, a terminally ill or deformed individual, feels like a marsupial, followed, wherever he goes, by his deformity just as the narrator is followed by his hospital bed. The reader is left with the vague impression that the narrator, seeing his impending death, committed suicide or perhaps was assisted.

I found the novel to be far more. Alliterative Analogies, assertively assembled, appear aplenty, appropriately, apt and artful, absorbing attention ad infinitum. Chapter 1 is composed with words beginning only with the letter A, Chapter 2 with A and B and so on until chapter 27, when Z first, then chapter by chapter all other letters, are progressively subtracted. Chasing after the thugs from country to country, we are introduced to a ruler queen transvestite, war and genocide, corrupted burocrats and soldiers, rampant corruption in a landscape still in hot air, where sparsely assembled people wollow in African Indolence.

All is narrated with poetic detachment, in a dimension between joke and dream that implies social, political and historical commentary with what appears linguistical accidentality: it is just that the words were limited by my artifice, reader, the Author seems to smile. No harm intended. Perhaps: the scenario may have seemed so far fetched in , to have been deemed the product of unabridged fantasy. Great art, when unhindered, relates to the whole of time, in all tenses.

While amusing, Abish has managed a ponderous read, which meandering on through verisimilar everyday history of attitudes and practices, inserts deep philosophical reflections as light as the puns enclosing them and extends like a prophecy to contemporary events. Attentive readers will delight in finding the one slip from the add-subtract letter scheme. And wonder: was it accidental? The master journalist H. Mencken once wrote, "If you are against labor racketeers, then you are against the working man.

If you are against demagogues, then you are against democracy. If you are against Christianity, then you are against God. If you are against trying a can of Old Dr. This novel is 23 years old; the Second World War ended over 59 years ago, yet the plot is still relevant today. It will be a long time before Germany as a nation, and the Germans as a people will be live apart from the legacy of Nazism and the atrocities and destruction that was wrought during those few years.

While the descendents of the victims will continue to usurp the role of the victim, the descendents of the perpetrators will inherit guilt for the crimes, and then there are those who are not sure how they fit into this scheme from a historical perspective. The story surrounds a writer who is the son of a former high ranking German military officer executed for his role in the plot to assassinate Hitler. While not a military story, this novel weaves through the daily activities of this man and the constantly reminders of the events past due to relationships both professional and personal, and a small band of terrorists, a very interesting plot.

Although written in , terrorism is explored as a form of expression for the disgruntled. The author does a good job to explain how a government can tweak the circumstances and the fears surrounding terrorism to gain more power, allocate more funding, and remove personal freedoms. The characters are well developed in this very important novel for it covers events that are beginning to find there way into American society.

Terrorism was a novelty in the United States in whereas it was already a common place event in the rest of the world. This novel will make you think about your lifestyle relative to the rest of the world. Very cleverly written. Guillelmus Ade , a churchman who had traveled extensively in the Middle East. His text proposing a new crusade to liberate the Holy Land is in effect a 14th century intelligence report. Modern historians consider it mostly accurate. After all, no new crusade was launched at the time.

On another level, however, his proposal is eminently realistic.


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In fact, Brother William of the Dominican Order seems to have been an eminently practical man, often on the verge of Realpolitik pure and simple. William identifies three main problems in the Mediterranean to be overcome before a new crusade could be launched: Christian commercial ties with the Mamluks, Christian pilgrims paying hefty tributes to the Muslims, and the collusion between Byzantium and certain Muslim rulers. Despite papal prohibition, Genoese and Venetian merchants had established lucrative trade deals with Egypt, providing the Mamluks with iron, wood, food and slaves.

In this way, the Mamluks were able to replenish their armories, build new galleys, and expand their armies. Thus, the Christians were in reality arming their Muslim adversaries for cheap profit! Likewise, pilgrims visiting Jerusalem paid monetary tributes to the Mamluk rulers. Later, they would visit Cyprus and get absolution from the local archbishop. That the Byzantines were colluding with the Muslims is less surprising. William proposes an immediate blockade of Egypt, what we would today call economic sanctions.

However, William is too realistic to think that purely spiritual or even political considerations are enough. He proposes impunity for anyone who plunders Christian merchant vessels destined for Mamluk ports. In effect, he wants to outsource the economic blockade to pirates. William is particularly well-disposed towards the Zaccaria brothers, who controlled several islands in the Aegean most notably Chios , from which they launched raids against merchant ships sailing between Egypt and the Crimea.

The crafty archbishop also proposes to seize the money paid by pilgrims for their indulgences at Cyprus, and use them to finance the upcoming crusade! Despite their conversion to Islam, the Ilkhanids were enemies of the Mamluks. They were also ill-disposed to their ethnic brethren the Golden Horde in southern Russia.

The port of Aden in Yemen was of pivotal importance at this trade route. William therefore proposes to build four galleys, attack Aden and then block the entrance to the Red Sea, in effect sneaking up on Egypt from behind. William had visited the area, and confidently reports that the inhabitants of Aden have weak defenses and an even weaker fighting-spirit. Also, there were Christian islands in the vicinity, including Socotra, from which armed attacks against Muslim shipping were already launched.

Nearby Ethiopia was Christian, albeit not Catholic. All land in between Europe and Ethiopia was controlled by Muslim rulers. However, the monkish intelligence operative thinks he has a solution even to this. While visiting Baghdad, he came across Genoese ship-builders working for the Ilkhan. Their ships could be safely sailed down the Tigris and thus reach the Indian Ocean. Thus, even the far-fetched proposal to block Egypt from both the Mediterranean and the Red Sea at once, turns out to be at least theoretically possible….

William, ever the realist, believes that the Zaccaria brothers should be granted an exemption, being allowed to trade with the Mamluks in order to obtain cash! The attempts to forge an alliance with the Mongols also failed, and hence all hopes to take perfidious Aden by surprise.

Humor ensues when the professor astonishes the knights and damsels with demonstrations of his phonograph, telegraph, telephone, camera, and phosphorus-tipped matches. There are some stark similarities between the two books: both novels feature a knight named Sir Sagramore. American humorist Charles Heber Clark wrote several works of proto-sf including the earliest-known feminist utopia story, in under the names "Max Adeler" and "John Quill. Gwynplaine MacIntyre. This story was written in in Mexico by Ecuadorian Malta.

Literary Obscurities

The town however has the story but also the magic to overlap events and personal animal similes as indicated in brackets. The basic arc of the story is that the Colonel lusts after Chepa, he murders the family and rapes both daughters: Chepa marries quickly but dies soon after comes back to haunt him, what can he do?. The town rely on their religion Candido loses his church in a fire and the burned Crucifix comes alive; another Father comes to build a concrete church and falls in with the baddies. Clotide starts to entice men and castrate them, what can doctor Juvenico do to help her?

Dominga needs a man to protect her from the tin-tins. Broderick and Di Filippo also show some courage in evaluating the overall output of some of the authors contained in their list as when they suggest that Card would be regarded as "a minor, respectable, forgotten craftsman" if not for the Ender series. The true value of the list, of course, is not in the reading pleasure it delivers but in leading the discerning user to new books and authors.

Even though I thought I had consumed modestly in the SF field in recent years, I still found 87 books I had not read, many of which I had not come across in any other forum. In using lists as sources for reading referral, not only have I located hidden classics but I have found that virtually all recommended books reach at least an acceptable level of literary merit. Caserio also brings new attention to lesser-known writers who merit increased attention.

All the more than 17, entries are free to read online. I thus learned who was the author of the earliest comedy, properly so called, in our language. Sewell, Bishop Percy, Dr. Nott, and their followers, from the second instead of the first edition. The differences between the two are not merely extremely curious, but very interesting and important. Between the one discovery and the other there was an interval of perhaps fifty years; and whatever may appear to be new in the ensuing volumes has been the result of literary investigation during considerably more than that period.

My early employments were irksome and wearisome; but, stimulated in some degree by my first success, and by my love for the best poetry the world has produced, I lightened my labors by the collection and perusal of old English books, and by making extracts from and criticisms upon them, whether in prose or verse; so that in time they formed a large body of manuscripts, consisting of separate articles alphabetically arranged.

The work in the hands of the reader has been mainly derived from this source, and not a few of the notices are of forty, or even fifty, years standing. Although I kept constantly adding to, altering and correcting them, both as to facts and opinions, some of them are, in the most material points, just as they came from my pen, soon after the perusal of the books to which they relate. It will be found that a few are reviews of productions altogether unknown to bibliographers, while others apply to publications of which only a single copy remains to us, or to separate tracts of the utmost rarity.

It is true that notices of a very few more common, but still scarce, books will be found interspersed, a circumstance arising from the fact that I have incorporated all the productions formerly embraced in what is generally known as the "Bridgewater Catalogue," which about thirty years ago I prepared for the first Earl of Ellesmere, and which was privately printed at the expense of that gifted, enlightened, and liberal nobleman. Through my hands in he dispersed, as presents, in different quarters of the globe, the fifty copies of which the whole impression consisted; but, some years after the completion of the undertaking, his Lordship expressed his regret, that the limitation in point of number much restricted the utility of that Catalogue.

He therefore authorized me at any time to reprint it, if I thought it would answer as a pecuniary speculation. I did not then listen to it, because I was still anxious to introduce corrections upon many of the pages; and because, even then, I contemplated a work upon a broader basis, and of a wider range, not limited to the contents of any single library, whether public or private. Readers may imagine that I have obtained much in formation from such works as Centura Literaria, " The British Bibliographer," or Restituta, to say nothing of smaller productions of a similar character.

This is a mistake. I have never referred to them without acknowledgment; but it will be found in the fourteen hundred pages that follow this preface that, excepting for the sake of illustration or for the correction of some important error, I have never criticised, or I may almost say, quoted a single volume noticed by others.

It was generally enough to induce me to lay an old book aside to find that it had already passed through the hands of Brydges, Park, or Haslewood. To the taste and learning of the first I bear willing testimony. The second possessed knowledge, but without much discrimination; and the third was a man remarkable for his diligence, but remarkable also for the narrowness of his views, for his total want of judgment, and for the paucity of his information. I can assert, without the chance of contradiction, that there is no one book, the merits or peculiarities of which are discussed in these volumes, that has not passed through my own hands and been carefully read by my own eyes.

There is no extract, no line, that has not been copied by my own pen; and although I cannot for an instant suppose that I have altogether avoided mistakes, I hope that I have made as few as possible. In a case of this sort, where hundreds of names occur, and thousands of dates are given, errors must inevitably have crept in; but I am aware of none, whether relating to books or their authors, that I have not set right in the "Additions, Notes and Corrections," placed at the beginning of my book, as it were, to solicit the indulgence of the reader in the outset.

It may be necessary to add, that I have purposely avoided old English dramas and plays, because they form so distinct a subject that they ought to be separately treated. I have by me many details regarding the plots, characters, poetry and appliances of performances of this description, from the remotest dates, some of them relating to productions hitherto unrecorded; and if time, opportunity and eyesight should unexpectedly and graciously be allowed me, it will much add to my happiness to be able hereafter to put them into shape for publication.

Bum spiro spero. The Index was not devised to make money nor win lame, but was an invention mothered by necessity. The search through dozens of publishers' bulletins and pamphlets, no two ot which, even by a kindly chance, were alike in shape, size, or arrangement, if indeed there were any arrangement at all,—such a search was paying too dear for our information. It was a necessity that this information should be collected in one place and arranged for use. No one seemed disposed to undertake the work ; even the six-months' list which supplemented the Annual American Catalogue, the only one which approached the cumulative plan, had been discontinued, and there was no choice but to provide for ourselves.

The name "index" was adopted as best defining the scope of the new publication. It was an author list, with brief title, price, and publisher, and references from titles and subjects to author entries. The name, though still retained, has been outgrown and does not adequately characterize the present volume.

How often the bibliography should lie reprinted was left to the future to determine. By many ot our patrons, the cumulative plan was not understood. They had been waiting so long for such a finding list, that when it was in their hands they did not recognize it. While one appreciative friend, Mr. Waters, of Pittsburg, the first to send us a good word, said that the Index was "too good to be true," others insisted that it was not true, and for over a year we received constant demands for back numbers, in spite of the assurance that back numbers were nseless, their contents having been reprinted in the latest number.

After the publication of the December number, which was a complete catalogueof thebooks of , our circle of friends increased and we were encouraged to make further improvements. A careful system was instituted under which few errors are likely to occur, or if made, can be promptly corrected. Before the publication of the Index of May , which was a cumulation of sixteen months, the whole bibliography was thoroughly revised and in large part rewritten, in order that the entry of each book might contain the full name of the author, the exact title as found on the title page, and other useful data before omitted.

Since the publication of the May number our bibliography, owing to careful methods, has grown rapidly and now numbers in the present volume about 17, books, or about 40, entries. Each entry has been compared with every available source of information, changes in prices and publishers have been recorded, and tables of contents have been added to the entries of those books not adequately described by title. This comparison has enabled us to discover mistakes in publishers' catalogues, and other book lists, and has won us the thanks of the Librarian of Congress for calling attention to a confusion of two authors of similar names and other errors in the copyright list.

These books are different in many ways from the modern novels but if you look closely you will recognize an aspect in the modern book which mirrors a theme or technique which was once considered brand new. Martin Edwards has once again given me a method for studying the classic crime novel and the authors who paved the way for all the changes which have taken place within the genre.

There is simply too much information in this book to give anything like a list of authors or even a list of book titles. I can tell you that there are twenty-four chapters, each dealing with a different aspect of the novels from miraculous murders also called impossible murders to the lure of the countryside, the English manor house, the amateur detective, the educated sleuth, the backlash against politicians and on and on.

In each chapter Edwards explains the theme, gives a brief synopsis of the examples of the novels he has chosen to illustrate the theme and a brief biography of the author. Each chapter discusses four or five novels. The book as a whole moves in a more or less chronological order, at least in the easiest way for the format to do that. The book also contains an Introduction, Select Bibliography, Index of Titles, and an Index of Authors which all provide a tremendous amount of detail on the subject. Even the most well known authors may have a novel mentioned in this collection which you have missed.

I was equally surprised at how many of the authors and stories I was familiar with as well as how many authors I knew nothing about. Even though I initially read this book in digital format I already know I will have to get the print edition so it can go on my shelf of Classic Age crime fiction reference books. How could I resist? The history of practical invention and of technical progress is one which might well engage the attention of students of anthropology and antiquities, as it throws light on many points connected with the growth of social life and civilization.

The desire and the power to turn external objects to his service and convenience are developed to such an extent in man, that, among the many differences between him and other animals, may be reckoned the various arts by which he induces nature to accommodate herself to his wants; among the lower animals one looks in vain for anything parallel to the arts of cookery, medicine, metallurgy—to the systematic use of tools, of clothing, of weapons.

In ancient times the various handicrafts were monopolies of certain families or castes; in the middle ages the handicraftsmen were too glad to pursue their callings in obscurity; it is only in the most recent years that arts and manufactures have acquired such paramount interest, that the special or technical education of those who are to exercise them has come to be thought of national importance. While, in the days of the Greeks and Romans, the artizan was a despicable if not an almost infamous person, and, in the middle ages, was oppressed by the military and ruling classes, against whom, nevertheless, he carried on a ceaseless struggle until he succeeded in asserting his importance, and even his equality with them, it has been reserved for the present day for ignorance of arts and manufactures, and indifference to their progress, to be as discreditable as they were formerly dignified.

The history of the growth of the arts themselves, and of the attitude of society towards them, is, therefore, of wider extent, and of greater philosophical interest than at first sight appears. This history has not as yet been written and, as time goes on and material gathers, the more difficult it becomes. The only work in which the attempt has been made is the "History of Inventions" of Beckmann, written towards the end of last century.

The essays, besides, are not arranged in any definite order, and have no direct connection with each other, but they are very elaborate, and show a wonderful amount of research and knowledge. There is certainly nothing on the subject in English. It is not my intention now to say anything about the progress of arts and manufactures at all, but only to bring under your notice a section of literature which is nearly ignored by bibliographers and antiquaries, and is altogether out of the ken of book-reprinting clubs.

It is hardly to be expected that a practical art can have any literature worth speaking of. The man who is busy practising it can have little time to write about it, and he who wishes to learn it must put to his hand and work at it, and that under the supervision of a master, and not by merely reading books. This is the apprenticeship that every one must serve. No amount of reading will make a sculptor, or a gardener, or a shoemaker, or a surgeon, or a musical executant. The arts must be acquired by practice, and they are extended and improved by practice. Every one who exercises them comes to have special power and certain ways of doing things, which may enable him to surpass others who are similarly engaged.

These are his "secrets," which very often he cannot, or will not, reveal to others. Rapid insight into a particular case, power of overcoming physical obstacles, ingenious adaptations of means to ends, exhibition of due care at the right time, enable one man to effect what others cannot. The philosopher was warned to admit no one to his laboratory—or to his confidence.

Even at the present day, secrets have not wholly died out; there are manufactures which are still undivulged, and any one engaged in the scientific investigation of some phenomenon or law of nature, will not tell his professional brethren unreservedly what he expects to discover, before he has finished his labours. It would seem, however, that in spite of the precautions of the older artists, their private ways of working, of producing substances, of making colours, and effecting all kinds of material changes, oozed out and became at last public property.

It is beyond my power to give a complete list of these; my purpose at present, as I have already said, is to exhibit a few of those to which my attention happens to have been recently directed, and of which some at least are possessed of a certain amount of archaeological and bibliographic interest.

This set of books divides into several groups, but perfect classification of them is impossible on account of the way the themes interweave. There are collections of secrets of nature, or treatises on natural history, general science, and cosmogony. This is the form which natural philosophy originally took.

There are treatises on technical or art secrets, strictly so called, and they may be arranged conveniently in two classes: general collections containing receipts relating to a variety of arts, and special collections containing receipts of use in one art or handicraft only. The author is a bit annoying in trying to narrowly define the detective story, however. Nowadays, when genres and sub-genres tend to be blended together for good or ill, this sort of distinction seems unnecessary. It reminds me of the used book store I visited where mystery was in one section and crime in another.

And thrillers in yet another. Also, unfortunately, the entire career of Dashiell Hammett, who even at that early date had already stopped writing. The main part of the book mentions Raymond Chandler only very briefly, but the years-after update does give him credit and add some of his works to the recommended list. More interesting, perhaps, are the writers that have been largely forgotten that Haycraft extolls, such as Mabel Sealey, who is pretty forgotten today.

His concise descriptions of his subjects' works, without any plot spoilers to speak of, will whet your appetite to try out some of these books, many of which are now in the public domain. Given his chosen framework, Haycraft only really errs when he states decisively that women do not make good fictional detectives. It is a bit jarring to read such a blatantly sexist statement in a book that is otherwise a model of balance. Haycraft, for instance, points out not just the strengths of each writer, but also their weaknesses.

Now that I know I have it, it comes upstairs to be on my reference shelf. What makes it extra-special is that it covers the world of writers in those genres for primarily the post-war period. Earlier reviews by contributing writers give us an overview of the various sub-genres in a clear and informative way. Hundreds of authors are discussed many of whom I had not heard of along with a list of their best or most popular books.

This section was put together by Dorothy B. This section alone is worth the price of admission. I have several of the standard reference texts on crime novels, but this one is the best. Highly recommended. Aside from Jon L. Moreover, Mr. Murphy provides etymological histories of terms often encountered in the mystery novel and dispels common misconceptions readers have about the true purposes of agencies like INTERPOL.

No subgenre is ignored: cozies, malice-domestics, psychological suspense, police procedurals, and the hard-boiled novel are all given equal attention. Brilliant, but forgotten crime writers like Charles Willeford, often ignored in other encyclopedias and bibliograpies, are finally given the respect they deserve. And cozy novelists Leo Bruce and Patricia Wentworth are rarely examined in the depth that they are here. Besides being comprehensive and informative, the book is just plain fun to read-a must for home libraries and coffee tables.

It is otherwise however with the literature of the North, and especially of Russia, of which even our men of letters, for the most part, know nothing more than what may be gleaned from the common Russian Miscellanies. The chief ground of this ignorance can only be looked for in our very limited acquaintance with the Sclavonic languages; and here the same reproach attaches to the Germans, on other points so studious of knowledge, which is justly brought against the French and Italians in regard to the literature of Germany.

Of all the kingdoms of the North, the Russian Empire, marching on with giant strides towards a state of perfection, rivets most our earnest attention; and yet its language and its literature continue to be almost entirely unknown. Since the beginning of the eigh- ,teenth century, we find intellectual relations existing between Russia and the other European communities; and a strict comparison would show, that at this period German literature itself occupied no very lofty position. Might not the Italians and French just as well plead this consideration as their excuse, if at the beginning of the nineteenth century they chose to believe that German literature had nothing very great to exhibit?

It is asserted that in Russia the higher classes only can make any pretensions to education; but it is forgotten that in every country the great mass of the people resemble each other in this particular, of which every traveller possessing the mere rudiments of any language may convince himself, if, instead of taking the chief towns only as the standard of his conclusions, he will submit to pass some time also with this view in the countryb.

Although the Russians as yet can boast no Gothe or Shakspeare—even supposing that these writers could be equalled—yet we already see them, since the middle of last century, in the track which, by the exercise of their extraordinary application and ability, must sooner or later bring them near this point. Gretsch, published in the Russian language at St. Petersburg, A. This work, written by the Russian imperial councillor of state, Nicolai von Gretsch, a distinguished philologist and grammarian, has been taken as the foundation of the present undertaking; the publication of which is intended to fill up a very perceptible void in our literature.

Besides the Russian authors mentioned by Herr von Gretsch, many others have been added to render the second part of this work more complete; especially those which Alexander Bestuscheff has enumerated in his Review of Russian Literature. Although on the whole I have adhered to the above-named work of Herr von Gretsch, it appeared to me better suited to my particular plan to divide the History of Literature into two parts; of which the first contains the proper History of Russian Literature, and the second, Biographical and Literary Notices of Russian Authors; and to which last, for the sake of greater convenience, I have given the form of a lexicon.

The prizes are reserved for the millionaire. But the most modest bibliophile, by the pursuit of one special subject, may get together a collection valuable for other reasons. I do not know that I deserve so ambitious a name as bibliophile, but I have no doubt as to the value of the collection of cookery books about which it has been my pleasure and privilege to write. I admit that to the moneyed book-hunter, though he would envy me a few of my volumes, a great number, from his point of view, might seem poor trash. Nor do I claim for my collection completeness.

I would not be so foolish with those two thousand five hundred entries in M. But then, M. Vicaire does not own the two thousand five hundred books, and I very much doubt whether any one individual ever will. The collector is but mortal. All I claim is that my collection has grown to respectable and, I believe, unrivaled proportions, and that the number of books in it, and the countries and centuries they represent lend them as a series the importance which it would be absurd to attribute to each taken separately.

As for the subject, mine first by chance and now by preference, it needs no apology. Everybody eats and everybody should enjoy eating. The old asceticism that held pleasure in food to be gluttony, and consequently one of the seven deadly sins, has all but disappeared. Every Woman has thrown off the traditional shackles and is no longer ashamed of an honest appetite. In one way, something of the old prejudice lingers. It is still considered demoralizing, or, at least, " bad form " to think much about food and drink. But this is a mistake.

It was when men and women began to think about eating that they developed it into the Fine Art it ought to be. Sounds might have remained mere noise but for the musician, colors mere discord but for the painter; eating would never have been more than a gross necessity but for the gourmet. Neither does the study of Gastronomy through the ages call for an explanation. It would be more to the purpose to explain why the historian and the philosopher have hitherto paid so little heed to the subject. The world still waits for the Carlyle who will write for it a Philosophy of Food. When he comes he will find in my collection the material made to his hand.

But if eating were not an art, if food had not its philosophy, my books would still be amusing, and that is their great recommendation. No black-letter man, nor tall copyist, nor uncut man, nor rough-edge man, nor early English dramatist, nor Elzevirian, nor broadsider, nor pasquinader, nor old brown calf man, nor Grangerite, nor tawny moroccoite, nor gilt copper, nor marbled insider, nor editio princeps man, to borrow Dr. Now this amusement, for several reasons, either dwindles, or else changes its character so completely, by the end of the eighteenth century that I have brought the story of my books and the bibliography down to no later date.

In the nineteenth century there were, on the one hand, the cookery books, prosaic as primers, that, with their business-like, practical, direct methods, were more useful in the kitchen than entertaining in the library; on the other hand, the books about cookery, so literary in flavor that they were not adapted to the kitchen at all.

The new writers, of whom Orimod de la Seyniere was the first great master, brought about such a revolution in not only the style, but the very attitude of writers on cookery, that I prefer to consider their work by itself. My study of all these books has made me sufficiently an artist to want to see my own volume as perfectly rounded out. It is my respect for them that shows me the folly of dogmatizing upon the many I do not know at first hand.

In the following pages, I do not pretend to rival M. Vicaire or Mr. Hazlitt bibliographicatty. I have not the temerity to wander further afield than my own collection. The illustrations speak for themselves. The old titlepage always has charm, and, in the cookery book, it has besides a character of its own. The portraits that appear as frontispieces are, to me, an endless source of delight.

What new dignity a cookery book acquires when a queen or a man of title presides over it! And with what increased deference one reads the receipts of the chef who evidently takes himself as seriously and solemnly as Robert May or E. I wish I could give all the portraits. But it would be unfair to my collection if I did not also show some of the amazing allegories which occasionally replaced the portrait as frontispiece, and of which the plates from Les Dons de Comus and Dr.

There are, moreover, the illustrations in the text. The models for the carver, whether of fish, fowl, or fruit, are characteristic, and the one design for setting a table barely does justice to a detail of dining, that, for long, pre-occupied the authorities. The eighteenth century books are full of such plates. It is impossible, however, to exhaust a collection like mine in a single volume.

I can only hope that what illustrations there are, together with my praise, all too feeble, of the irresistible text, will send the curious to the originals. The book is pages of mystery authors - listed alphabetically and giving descriptons of the authors' characters, the authors' lives and biographical bits. The books are broken down by code within the genre: ie, Action and Adventure, Comedy, Classic Sleuths, Private Eyes, Thriller and many many more categories.

I recommend this book as either a reference book or as just a darned good read. Thank you, Bill and Marcia for taking the time to write this book. An examination of so much as Mr.

PROPHECIES OF JESUS' SECOND COMING NOW REVEALED! - Perry Stone

Power had done on the subject of bibliography, led me to the conclusion that he had not made a personal examination of the books described, and that the eminent individuals, whom he thanks as having rendered him valuable assistance, must have had rather limited bibliographical resources; indeed, the general result was so disappointing that I determined to endeavor an improvement, and the result is the present list which is about four times the extent of Mr.

I cannot close this brief notice without tendering my thanks to Mr. Charles A. Cutter of the Boston Athenaeum for his valuable aid. When librarians in general can approach his standard of library intelligence, there will cease to be that plentiful lack of knowledge by which some of them are now distinguished.

Breath taking, because it wishes to tell the history of the novel since its inception [evolutionary origins if you prefer], and parochial because the work wishes to focus on the English Novel. The latter goal is never, really, accomplished because so many novels, written in languages other than English have influenced the English Novel. There is, also, the problem of the antecedents of the novel that are not even mentioned — such as The Tale of Genji [a Japanese classic — published early in the 11th century…if you were to go by the still popular Gregorian Calendar—dating is its own political nightmare].

Each chapter tends to follow a, generally, chronological motif, but within the chapter other authors are brought in as inheritors or antecedents of the work being discussed. What this does is to help the reader place the book in history and in its influence and, therefore, importance. What is frustrating about Mr. Still, this history is fascinating and very idiosyncratic. The major drawback to a book such as The Novel is that it is just too bloody long for most readers, and impossible to carry about in its physical form. The sheer physical reality of the book does not permit this—this is, however, somewhat offset by the increasing popularity of eBooks.

Having said all of this, it is an important book, and one that should be read by anyone interested in the history of the English novel. The Novel should also, and most specifically, be read by Indie authors not having a firm grounding in the Canon, in all its mutant glory. After all, if you are going to write fiction you should be aware of the traditions you are writing in.

Why Schmidt is important in this respect is that he does not consider the Canon to be made up of strictly Literary Fiction, but also includes important Genre authors as well. He is a little cautious with idea of Literary Fiction and Genre but that is another discussion—shouting match? In the end, this history earns a respectable 4 out of 5 stars.

The subtraction of one star is because of its length; its lack of references, and its sometimes-questionable aesthetics—see Burroughs and Kerouac, amongst others. It is, in a literary way, an embarrassment of riches. Describing this extensive overview of everything worth noting about 20th century literature in English can be compared to the blind men describing an elephant. So much to cover, so many varieties of prose, and so little space to describe it all.

The giants are here, and if greatness is measured by the space allotted to them, then D. Lawrence leads, with two full pages dedicated to his achievements, followed by James Joyce, T. Yeats with one page. LeGuin and Michael Moorcock fantasy , J. Identifying these movements can sometimes be an exercise in deciphering obscure meanings. The entry on Modernism, for example, defines clearly its practitioners. Their works, however, "indicate the breach with the conventions of rational exposition and stylistic decorum in the immediate post-war period.

Apart from that caveat, this Oxford Companion is a worthwhile aid through 20th century literature. Which one that is right for you depends entirely on where your taste in literature lies. Sepulture and Sepulchral Inscriptions, but merely as a catalogue of such books on those subjects as in the course of my reading have come to my notice.

I am painfully conscious of the deficiencies of this compilation. A small additional expenditure of time might have corrected many defects. I had not the additional time to spare, and the question was either to print my imperfect notes as they were, or not to print at all. The former alternative prevailed, and my daughter arranged the following titles for the press. I do not pretend to have so much as seen the majority of the books catalogued, and, judging from the number of misleading titles I discovered, I doubt not but many have escaped detection.

My excuse for earing in this field of literature is, I but follow the examples of, among others, the lawyers, Spellman, Bosio, and Collinson. Adams and Dr. Hugo Erichsons' "Bibliographies of Cremation. I regret my inability at present to produce Part II, for if the compilation has any interest, it lies chiefly in the second part. My friends will kindly take notice that I solicit additions to my catalogue and memoranda of errors. But besides these, some thousands of additional names have been selected, which will be of service to the reader in many departments of intellectual activity.

It has not been any part of the plan to attempt a comprehensive list of those who have written books; but, following the idea of similar works to present names, in many departments, fairly representative of literary history. While this general and cosmopolitan plan has been adhered to, considerable prominence has been given to American names, and to writers who have won distinction in works on law, art, travel, and exploration, and indeed in all liberal pursuits. The "promotion and diffusion of knowledge among mankind" has been held to be an object worthy of the highest human effort. To have contributed to this effort has been the purpose of those engaged in this work.

In preparing it the best authorities in many languages have been consulted ; but those familiar with dictionaries and cyclopaedias know how liable they are to err. If we have erred as to dates or names in this, it has probably been from having to make a choice between several authorities disagreeing and of good standing. The plot is bizzare, to say the least. A man discovers that he has radish sprouts growing from his shins. His condition baffles the doctor at a local dermatology clinic, who sends him away in a self propelled hospital bed, telling him to try hot spring treatment.

While en-route to the hot springs, he is cast down a dark tunnel and ends up on the shores of hell. Early in the novel, the narrator comments that marsupials are essentially inferior versions of mammals. The narrator, a terminally ill or deformed individual, feels like a marsupial, followed, wherever he goes, by his deformity just as the narrator is followed by his hospital bed.

The reader is left with the vague impression that the narrator, seeing his impending death, committed suicide or perhaps was assisted. I found the novel to be far more. Alliterative Analogies, assertively assembled, appear aplenty, appropriately, apt and artful, absorbing attention ad infinitum. Chapter 1 is composed with words beginning only with the letter A, Chapter 2 with A and B and so on until chapter 27, when Z first, then chapter by chapter all other letters, are progressively subtracted.

Chasing after the thugs from country to country, we are introduced to a ruler queen transvestite, war and genocide, corrupted burocrats and soldiers, rampant corruption in a landscape still in hot air, where sparsely assembled people wollow in African Indolence. All is narrated with poetic detachment, in a dimension between joke and dream that implies social, political and historical commentary with what appears linguistical accidentality: it is just that the words were limited by my artifice, reader, the Author seems to smile.

No harm intended. Perhaps: the scenario may have seemed so far fetched in , to have been deemed the product of unabridged fantasy. Great art, when unhindered, relates to the whole of time, in all tenses. While amusing, Abish has managed a ponderous read, which meandering on through verisimilar everyday history of attitudes and practices, inserts deep philosophical reflections as light as the puns enclosing them and extends like a prophecy to contemporary events.

Attentive readers will delight in finding the one slip from the add-subtract letter scheme. And wonder: was it accidental? The master journalist H. Mencken once wrote, "If you are against labor racketeers, then you are against the working man. If you are against demagogues, then you are against democracy.

If you are against Christianity, then you are against God. If you are against trying a can of Old Dr. This novel is 23 years old; the Second World War ended over 59 years ago, yet the plot is still relevant today. It will be a long time before Germany as a nation, and the Germans as a people will be live apart from the legacy of Nazism and the atrocities and destruction that was wrought during those few years.

While the descendents of the victims will continue to usurp the role of the victim, the descendents of the perpetrators will inherit guilt for the crimes, and then there are those who are not sure how they fit into this scheme from a historical perspective. The story surrounds a writer who is the son of a former high ranking German military officer executed for his role in the plot to assassinate Hitler.

While not a military story, this novel weaves through the daily activities of this man and the constantly reminders of the events past due to relationships both professional and personal, and a small band of terrorists, a very interesting plot. Although written in , terrorism is explored as a form of expression for the disgruntled.

into the future

The author does a good job to explain how a government can tweak the circumstances and the fears surrounding terrorism to gain more power, allocate more funding, and remove personal freedoms. The characters are well developed in this very important novel for it covers events that are beginning to find there way into American society.

Terrorism was a novelty in the United States in whereas it was already a common place event in the rest of the world. This novel will make you think about your lifestyle relative to the rest of the world. Very cleverly written. Guillelmus Ade , a churchman who had traveled extensively in the Middle East. His text proposing a new crusade to liberate the Holy Land is in effect a 14th century intelligence report. Modern historians consider it mostly accurate. After all, no new crusade was launched at the time. On another level, however, his proposal is eminently realistic.


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In fact, Brother William of the Dominican Order seems to have been an eminently practical man, often on the verge of Realpolitik pure and simple. William identifies three main problems in the Mediterranean to be overcome before a new crusade could be launched: Christian commercial ties with the Mamluks, Christian pilgrims paying hefty tributes to the Muslims, and the collusion between Byzantium and certain Muslim rulers. Despite papal prohibition, Genoese and Venetian merchants had established lucrative trade deals with Egypt, providing the Mamluks with iron, wood, food and slaves.

In this way, the Mamluks were able to replenish their armories, build new galleys, and expand their armies. Thus, the Christians were in reality arming their Muslim adversaries for cheap profit! Likewise, pilgrims visiting Jerusalem paid monetary tributes to the Mamluk rulers. Later, they would visit Cyprus and get absolution from the local archbishop. That the Byzantines were colluding with the Muslims is less surprising. William proposes an immediate blockade of Egypt, what we would today call economic sanctions. However, William is too realistic to think that purely spiritual or even political considerations are enough.

He proposes impunity for anyone who plunders Christian merchant vessels destined for Mamluk ports. In effect, he wants to outsource the economic blockade to pirates. William is particularly well-disposed towards the Zaccaria brothers, who controlled several islands in the Aegean most notably Chios , from which they launched raids against merchant ships sailing between Egypt and the Crimea.

The crafty archbishop also proposes to seize the money paid by pilgrims for their indulgences at Cyprus, and use them to finance the upcoming crusade! Despite their conversion to Islam, the Ilkhanids were enemies of the Mamluks. They were also ill-disposed to their ethnic brethren the Golden Horde in southern Russia. The port of Aden in Yemen was of pivotal importance at this trade route. William therefore proposes to build four galleys, attack Aden and then block the entrance to the Red Sea, in effect sneaking up on Egypt from behind.

William had visited the area, and confidently reports that the inhabitants of Aden have weak defenses and an even weaker fighting-spirit. Also, there were Christian islands in the vicinity, including Socotra, from which armed attacks against Muslim shipping were already launched. Nearby Ethiopia was Christian, albeit not Catholic. All land in between Europe and Ethiopia was controlled by Muslim rulers. However, the monkish intelligence operative thinks he has a solution even to this. While visiting Baghdad, he came across Genoese ship-builders working for the Ilkhan.

Their ships could be safely sailed down the Tigris and thus reach the Indian Ocean. Thus, even the far-fetched proposal to block Egypt from both the Mediterranean and the Red Sea at once, turns out to be at least theoretically possible…. William, ever the realist, believes that the Zaccaria brothers should be granted an exemption, being allowed to trade with the Mamluks in order to obtain cash! The attempts to forge an alliance with the Mongols also failed, and hence all hopes to take perfidious Aden by surprise.

Humor ensues when the professor astonishes the knights and damsels with demonstrations of his phonograph, telegraph, telephone, camera, and phosphorus-tipped matches. There are some stark similarities between the two books: both novels feature a knight named Sir Sagramore. American humorist Charles Heber Clark wrote several works of proto-sf including the earliest-known feminist utopia story, in under the names "Max Adeler" and "John Quill.

Gwynplaine MacIntyre. This story was written in in Mexico by Ecuadorian Malta. The town however has the story but also the magic to overlap events and personal animal similes as indicated in brackets. The basic arc of the story is that the Colonel lusts after Chepa, he murders the family and rapes both daughters: Chepa marries quickly but dies soon after comes back to haunt him, what can he do?. The town rely on their religion Candido loses his church in a fire and the burned Crucifix comes alive; another Father comes to build a concrete church and falls in with the baddies. Clotide starts to entice men and castrate them, what can doctor Juvenico do to help her?

Dominga needs a man to protect her from the tin-tins. DARK ENTRIES, which sports a gorgeously illustrated cover, is a fine place to start with Aickman because it was his first solo collection published in his lifetime he had published a collection of stories with his one time girlfriend Elizabeth Jane Howard in the 50s , and features some of his finest stories, such as his deepest exploration into gender differences, "Choose Your Weapons," and the most famous and anthologized of all his stories, "Ringing the Changes. The story opens with a couple, mismatched in age, making a vacation trip to an out-of-the-way town in East Anglia that had been an important seaport in medieval times, before the harbor had silted up and pushed the town away from the sea.

The town is largely deserted, and the few citizens the couple come across make oblique references to the couple being in danger; in the mean time a local old church begins ringing its bell for no apparent reason, and as the day wears on and the mystery of the town deepens, the ringing bell is joined by others, which intensify the overall sense of dread. Lovecraft, who also deals with a visitor stumbling onto the horrific truth about a seemingly nearly-deserted coastal town in his fine story "The Shadow over Innsmouth".

Robert Aickman is one of the finest British writers and international masters of the strange tale form in the 20th century: it is terrific seeing him made available to a broader audience. During his lifetime, Aickman published 47 short stories, and two more pieces have come into print since his death in His first tale came out in ; the pace of publication rose dramatically in the s and 70s, and nearly half of his stories were published after , in the last four original collections. Almost as good were "The Inner Room" , "The Visiting Star" and "The Hospice" , despite extra layers of obscurity or developments bordering on parody.

By comparison, many other pieces by the author often contained something memorable but felt lacking in one element or another. Another type of worthwhile story from this writer expressed something more of what might be called his philosophical outlook, and for me the clearest of these was "The Wine-Dark Sea" Others were "Into the Wood" and "The View" The present collection contained just two of the tales from above: "The Swords" and "The Hospice," works about sexual initiation and death, and were mainly what made this collection worthwhile.

The rest of the later pieces here, for me, were in the category of "not his best," comparatively lacking in depth and power. These four books contain 31 pieces altogether, including all but one of the stories named above. As a modern virtuoso of atmospheric horror, Robert Aickmaninjects each of his "strange stories" with a lingering, surreal terror.

The most pronounced of these themes are doomed romance, communal hauntings, and abominable, monstrous offspring. A typical story begins with the protagonist venturing into the unknown, perhaps going to a new country or city, though sometimes the change is as simple as beginning a new job or visiting the theatre. In "The View," a man named Carfax is recovering from a vague illness. His doctor suggests taking a long holiday at an island retreat.

On the boat Carfax meets a woman who is the sole inhabitant of a small mansion. She opens her home to him, and they slip effortlessly into an affair. Carfax is an artist and attempts several drawings around the mansion, becoming alarmed as the surrounding landscape seems to shift somehow from day to day. This fateful decision leaves them stranded in the small, dreary, seaside town of Holihaven. The town is saturated with a terrible, fishy sea-stench; the water has rolled back far from the town, leaving a deep shoreline of muck; and worst of all, the odd inhabitants are obviously up to something infernal with their late-night bell ringing.

These stories have nothing to do with the heavy-handed, popular, shock horror usually associated with the genre. There are no movie monsters here, no blood-soaked demoniacs or ritualistic serial killers. His signature technique is a sort of narrative ambiguity. For instance, in "The Houses of the Russians" a character has a close brush with fate outside a pub. Apparently he is nearly run down in the street, and his escape is something of a miracle.

Yet Aickman never gives a clear picture of the scene. Once accustomed to his style, we realize that Aickman has managed to shake our imaginations free of their passiveness and has engaged us in an active relationship with his strange world. Robert Aickman was a writer of what he called strange stories , but of the eight stories in this collection The Fetch is the only piece resembling a traditional ghost story. The twentieth century was a time of disorientations, when Europeans were walking "on overgrown paths" as Knut Hamsun famously put it.

So how is one supposed to act in such situations? Aickman reveals subtle and ambiguous sympathies for fascism and Nazism in this book - admittedly far more ambiguous than those of Hamsun. In the final story of this volume, Into the Woods , a Polish officer asserts there was "darkness on both sides" in what Aickman describes elsewhere The Inner Room as "the late, misguided war". And in Never Visit Venice Aickman mentions an inscription left "by the previous regime" i. This has been left up, not just for difficulty of access but also apparently for deeper reasons.

Jude is a member of an old, aristocratic family, and an authority on obscure 18th century poets. Jude named for the patron saint of lost causes? In another story, a character observes that "the Greeks used to decorate their houses with flowers and sing songs. Now they buy tinsel from shops and listen to radios. Mass tourism has made the world into "a single place, not worth leaving home to see. This undefinable something acts as a barrier between Fern and other people, and holds him back in his career. He feels work and relationships are largely a charade, and one girlfriend accuses him of being "too soulful".

He dreams of a woman with whom he attains understanding and affinity. Everyone in Venice is dead. It is a dead city. Perhaps it died when Tristan und Isolde was composed here. Aickman is not without humour, though, as shown in the grotesque and hilarious Growing Boys. The boys' repulsive father, a hypocritical, Guardian-reading leftist called Phineas Morke, is seen by his own wife as resembling "an immensely long anchovy, always with the same expression at the end of it. Into the Woods delves into more esoteric regions.

This tale of insomniacs read: initiates whose knowledge makes them feared by the general populace is an allegory about finding the true Self, which very few ever do. The first two chapters are absolutely excruciating to read: incredibly well managed, funny, weird, tense, well conceived, and utterly bizarre. The child is offered a strawberry ice cream.

After that utterly unique start the book unravels, or rather, Aira relaxes into a sequence of set-pieces that could have been independent short stories. Aira is a stupendously talented storyteller, and I intend to read everything of his that is translated. It will be interesting to see if his other books have different strengths, or if he is caught in a structureless collages of short-form set pieces. It describes the afternoon and evening of the last day of the year, culminating at midnight - a moment that is part of neither the old or the new.

Of this family, it is Patri, the oldest daughter, on whom the focus comes to rest. As the stepdaughter of the watchman - part of the family, yet also apart - and a teenager - neither child nor adult - Patri glides through the day until she receives a one time opportunity to attend a party like none other. For those who are already familiar with Magical Realism, you may wish to let your feelings about this manner of writing be your guide with Ghosts , as it seems fully entrenched in it. If his goal was to paint an image in my mind of the shape and texture of being in-between , then I think he succeeded, but if he was attempting something more than this limited objective, then I have to honestly admit that I was baffled.

I usually assign the blame to myself when I have this kind of difficulty, as long as the writer has proved his ability in other areas, which I think Aira does. Lastly, although I know that cover blurbs are only a marketing device designed to sell books, I do get fed up with their misrepresentations, and try to point them out when I see them.

My snap impression is that the author of the quote randomly selected a name Sebald that is known but not yet widely read popularly obscure?